An overview of Training Methods

Training methods are essential in not only to sports personalities as they endeavor to be the best they can in their fields but also to individuals as they strain to acquire an athletic figure and lose fat. Training not only improves performance but also raises productivity in an individual. In choosing a training program, individuals normally worry over how hard they should work or train which can be addressed by the training intensity as defined by various training methods. Optimal training levels vary from person to person and it’s critical not to exceed these levels as this would otherwise result in injuries. Lower intensity training is essential in keeping the general cardiovascular health but does not enable the trainee to reach prime level for maximal performance. Secondly, the duration of exercise is critical in choosing the training method. Longer durations such as a thirty minute training session with an 85% maximum heart rate may be viewed as more beneficial than a shorter training period at the same intensity. However, intensity declines with duration therefore lesser effort is put into the exercises as desired due to fatigue. Finally, beginners worry about the volume and the number of exercises desired to reach optimum. This, coupled with the effectiveness of a given training method, that is, how fast results are attained, influences the choice or the training methods to be applied. Three most advocated upon training methods have been analyzed and compared as to their intensity, volume and duration. Further, macro, meso, and micro cycles per periodization training have been considered.
Weight or resistance training
This chiefly focuses on building strength and power by creating a local muscular endurance as enhanced by exercising against a resistance. Such training provides a contraction force as the muscle resists weights such as a barbell or a dumbbell. Weight training is significantly different from other training methodologies such as circuit training and plyometric training as discussed here-in in that it chiefly focuses on making the muscle bulge rather than the overall physique appearance.
In weight training, common mistakes by most people are that they chose to follow programs used by an elite athlete or overtraining so as to develop resistance as fast as possible. For beginners, no matter the exercise plan they follow, a progress is always shown. However, for advanced weight trainers, there is a need to work smarter. Therefore, progress can only be made during the break between workouts that ensures recovery. This goes a long way in preventing overtraining.
Today, the popular weight training dogma has been based on practices of elite athletes, weightlifters and power lifters. They can easily recover from greater volume of workouts though they might use illicit ergogenic aids when recuperating without which their great volumes of workouts would otherwise be detrimental. It is vital to note that the ACSM Weight Training guidelines state that in exercising, performing more than one set elicits slightly greater gains in strength but has however little additional improvement. This view is supported by most analysts in studies on strength and muscle hypertrophy (Feigenbaum, 1996). Experienced weight trainers usually chose split programs which incorporate two or more exercises for every muscle group. In their case, a second set is justified by the fact that a warm up set allows greater intensity for the consequent workout set.
In weight training, the intensity, duration and frequency components are inversely proportional. This implies that decreasing one component may be compensated for but one or both the other two components. For instance, training each group of muscle in every 4 instead of three days, which implies a decreased frequency, increasing the duration through the number of sets or exercises or via increased intensity by the amount of weight used may compensate for any losses.
However, intensity also has a direct effect on the other two components in the long-run. Decreasing intensity may lead to lesser strength and muscle gains which increased duration or intensity cannot compensate for. Furthermore, if the duration of a workout is too long, intensity unintentionally declines. Each additional set on the training program leads to the trainee holding back strength in reserve for it thereby putting lesser effort in their workout. Fatigue from all the additional exercises performed in one set goes even further in limiting the trainee in performing any other sets.

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